Coat

Sewaholic Minoru Quilted Raincoat

Living in England means we have a lot of rain to contend with. All year round. Yet the one thing I don’t have is a raincoat. The Sewaholic Minoru looked like the ideal pattern to make a fitted raincoat.

I found a water-resistant quilted nylon in a rather bright purple (and ruined my attempt to stop buying new fabric). The fabric itself is pretty much waterproof, but the stitching that makes up the quilted diamonds lets the water seep in. I think the coat will be ok in a shower. Not so much in a downpour!

Going by my measurements, I cut a size 10 and made a 2″ full bust adjustment. I used the Minoru FBA guide on the Sewaholic site and transferred the side dart into front neckline gathers.

I made a few tweaks to my version, including adding big patch pockets since the pattern doesn’t have any. I can’t imagine why you’d have a coat without any pockets! For my patch pockets, I drew a rectangle big enough to fit my hand, cut off one corner, then cut two each from my outer and lining fabric. I sewed the lining and outer together around the top, corner, side and bottom, then turned it right side out through the remaining open side seam. I topstitched each pocket to the front. The open side seam was sewn underneath the front placket.

If you’ve seen my Instagram, you’ll see I tried to add a welt pocket first. It was a disaster. The test runs turned out ok but the real one looked awful. Luckily I had enough fabric to start again with a whole new front piece.

This collar is massive. Seriously, it’s absolutely huge. If I lift my shoulders it covers my eyes. It works great for keeping the wind out but it’s pretty ridiculous. And annoying. Combined with the huge hood it looks mad. I guess it’ll keep me warm and dry though…

I lined my hood with soft fleece to make it really cosy. I like the idea of having a hidden hood, but I know I’d never actually zip the hood away. So I omitted the zipper in the collar, and sewed the hood directly to the coat. I’m glad I did as the hood would be too bulky to hide away neatly.

To make the hood fit better, I changed the pattern into a 3-piece hood. The pink lines show the original pattern piece and the blue lines show my new pattern piece. I removed 2″ from the original pattern (so 4″ in total as the hood is originally 2 pieces). Measure the hood length around your new seam line. Your new 3rd rectangular piece needs to measure 4″ x hood length. It’s tricky to sew as you need to make a curved seam fit a straight one, but take it slowly and it should work out.

Minoru Hood

When it comes to the topstitching, one handy trick I’ve learnt is to use grey thread. A grey in the same tone as your fabric can work just as well as a matching colour. I have a stash of various tones of grey. It works out a lot cheaper than buying thread in a new colour for every project.

My lining is a lemon yellow brushed cotton, or winceyette. It’s the same stuff used for making sheets and baby bedding. It’s really soft and warm and perfect for a cosy coat lining. I used a yellow satin for the arms to make it easier to get the coat on and off. I finished off the hem and lining by hand stitching.

Quilted minoru 2

Quilted minoru 1
Quilted minoru 5

Quilted minoru 6

 

 

The alterations I made were:

  • a 3-piece hood.
  • lined the hood.
  • a fixed hood and no zip in the collar.
  • a full bust adjustment.
  • patch pockets.
  • hand stitched the hem.

This was my first Sewaholic pattern and will not be my last. It’s so well written and put together. And for a coat it was super simple. This is one of those patterns that has to be made more than once, but my next version will definitely feature a less ridiculous collar.

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